Digital: A Complement to In-Store Customer Experience

Last spring, I worked on a class project in partnership with Target. The objective of the assignment was to use the new technology behind Target’s Cartwheel App to elevate the in-store shopping experience with a focus on how employees could leverage this technology to improve guest (customer) interactions.

My team’s initial struggle with the assignment centered around the employee-focused nature of the assignment. The Cartwheel App is a cost savings app designed for Target guests as the end users, not the Target team members. The first step to developing a solution that leveraged the Cartwheel App to elevate the in-store experience was to shift the focus directly to the end user: the guest. This change of scope allowed us more freedom to create a solution that was both beneficial and engaging for the Target shoppers.

Recently, this Mashable article caught my eye. For the original scope of this blog, fashion brands had always been on my radar as they have been at the forefront of incorporating user-generated content into their digital presence as well as elevating their digital presence with elements of the in-store retail experience and brand heritage. Custom and user-generated content help drive brand engagement and brand loyalty in many industries. The article mentioned above highlights Burberry’s new attitude towards the convergence of  in-store and digital experiences.

In short, Burberry strives to elevate the in-store experience by incorporating elements of it’s digital retail world into the in-store shopping experience. This philosophy stands at a stark contrast to the rest of the fashion and retail industry that continues to focus on bringing the physical store elements to their online environments.

Using new technologies to marry the two worlds of commerce, the physical and the digital, elevates the Burberry experience beyond the competition. It also creates a more engaging experience for the customer when they visit the physical retail store. Using RFID technology to create a custom content experience for a customer in the store creates an environment similar to the one they would find while shopping online. The content is tailored to the specific customer based on what items they are picking up in the store, which mirrors the experience of being served custom content based on what you search for in the online shop. This level of personalization drives engagement with the brand because you are serving customers with the types of content that they find entertaining, informative, or interesting as opposed to a generic content piece designed to please the masses.

Other retailers, like Target, should take note: E-commerce is not killing retail. When integrated correctly, a company’s digital environments serve to complement the in-store retail experience and drive customer engagement.

 

Social Media: The New Way to Pay

As I was sitting in class trying to pay attention (read: scrolling through my Twitter feed), something unusual caught my eye: Marc Jacobs Pop Up Shop Takes Tweets, Instagrams for Payment. Intrigued, I clicked the link to learn more about this unusual exchange of value. 

We talk a lot in class about social media engagement with brands, but it never occurred to me that companies would have a way to rank individual users based on engagement with the brand across platforms. This concept is called Social Currency, and according to Brian Solis, it ranks the value of a person’s social brand engagement like a credit score ranks a person’s creditworthiness. This way, brands can tell who is more important during social media interactions. 

Marc Jacobs is taking the concept of Social Currency one step further in the limited time Daisy Marc Jacobs Tweet Shop. In this Soho pop-up shop, customers exchange currency for products, just not in the way you would think. Instead of paying for your favorite perfume with dollars and cents, you can pay in “social currency.” This means that all you have to do to take home that gorgeous new Marc Jacobs necklace, delicious fragrance, or -for the especially social savvy among us- that lovely purse is Tweet, Instagram, Facebook, or otherwise socially engage the company while you shop. 

What a way to reward customers for continued loyalty and engagement! I can’t even imagine the line to get into the store at this point, seeing as Marc Jacobs has a very large and very involved social media following.

To me, this three day pop-up shop event shows that Marc Jacobs appreciates customers for more than the money they spend on products. The brand is showing customers that the time and effort they put into engaging with the brand online is more valuable than the $75 it takes to purchase Daisy perfume. I have no doubt that this event will endear the brand even more in the hearts of the loyal and socially engaged followers. I applaud Marc Jacobs for redefining the typical dollars and cents transaction to one of comparable value: social engagement with a vast network that Marc Jacobs didn’t have to seek out and pay to engage with. I am interested to see if any other brands catch on and try something like this in the future. Until then, bravo Marc Jacobs!