A Game of Platforms

If you’re a Game of Thrones fan like me, you were likely greeted with the spinning wheel of frustration (better known as buffering) when you tried to log into HBO Go on Sunday to catch the Game Of Thrones Season 4 premiere. While every social platform was buzzing with Game of Thrones chatter, HootSuite was capitalizing on the GOT buzz with their YouTube video A Game of Social Thrones. Piggybacking off of an infographic they released in 2013 called Social Media Winter is Coming that detailed the 2013 tensions between House Facebook, House Twitter, and House Google, Friday’s video reimagines the opening landscape of Game of Thrones as the The Social Game of Thrones. Each “Social House” is depicted as it’s own kingdom, with the elusive House Snapchat operating north of the Wall. Does anyone else think that’s a reference to the free roaming Wildlings or freaky White Walkers north of the Wall, or is that just the GOT fan in me reading too far into the situation…

The one thing the Social Game of Thrones has that House Stark, House Baratheon, and House Lannister do not? The uniting social force of HootSuite campaigning to “Unite Your Social Kingdoms” in the much less bloody #GameofSocial

Well played, HootSuite, well played.

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Yelp Reviews…For the Subway?

I love review sites. Yelp, TripAdvisor, Urban Spoon, you name it I’ve used it to find anything from a good restaurant to a good dry cleaner in my area. I like to be able to get a feel for the business before I decide to become a customer there. I also like to let other people know if they should refrain from becoming a customer at a business I have had a horrible experience with (by the looks of it, we all do). That being said, most businesses that are reviewed on customer rating sites have a range of reviews from great to terrible, but most reviews trend towards these two extremes. In a recent Mashable article, a study of customer reviews of the world’s subway systems shows another side of the ratings story: humor. 

When I recently traveled to New York, I used TripAdvisor reviews to decide which hotel to stay in and I used Yelp and Urban Spoon to find restaurants to try. It never occurred to me to use Yelp to check out the MTA because it is, after all, the only subway option in town. While there are many serious reviewers of the subway system who call for changes in New York City, I did some digging to find some particularly useful ones. And by useful, I mean they are a funny way to pass the time on your next subway commute. 

Yelp user L. William, a NYC native, says “I can’t take a nap without being woken up by flipping break dancers, Mariachi performers, or those men with long dreadlocks who play the African drums. If I wanted entertainment, I’d go to the theater.” At least the D train is cheaper. 

Reviewer Danika C. says “Yes, the bus comes when it wants. Have a schedule? Good for you, but it’s still not going to be on time. But when I think of the Big Apple, MTA is the Core.” I see what you did there, Danika C. Clever. 

Monica T. wants to help us tourists out by suggesting specific subway stations to use. In reference to a stop at West 4th street, “I’d advise a tourist who really wants to know what an average subway station looks like to go to this one.” I’ll be sure to stand in awe of this particularly average subway station next time I’m in the city for a visit thanks to you Monica. 

And the most useful and humorous review award goes to Tom T. who astutely observes, “It’s a good place to catch a train. It is a train station.” 

Online customer reviews can make or break a business. Luckily for the public transportation systems of the world, these funny reviews are just another way to help a morning commute pass by in a flash.